Caregivers At Risk.

It is not easy to talk about our parents or even ourselves getting older and some day needing help with very basic things. Here is information designed to educate the public about these issues.

Finding the words to begin a long term care conversation. (Genworth)

Beyond Dollars Infographic exposing the true costs of a long term care event. (pdf)

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LongTermCare.gov – Basic information about what is covered by Medicare and Medicaid.

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There are different ways to fund long term care: self-insure, long term care insurance*, life insurance or annuity with a long term care rider*, life insurance with a chronic illness rider*, Medicaid.
* Insurance is medical underwritten. Insuring locks in age and health.
27% of applicants ages 60-69 are declined because of health.

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A Solution for Caregiver Shortage: Robots

The government of Japan expects a shortage of 370,000 caregivers for the elderly by 2025, and is will look to robots to help provide care in institutions and at home.

Robots can transfer patients who are unable to move themselves from bed to a wheelchair, or to a bath, for example.

A new robot named Named RIBA (Robot for Interactive Body Assistance) has been developed by RIKEN and Tokai Rubber Industries (TRI). Using the latest sensor, control, information processing, mechanical and materials technology, it is the first of its kind in the world. So far, RIBA can safely lift and move a human patient of up to 61 kg (around 135 lb.).

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RIBA’s arms have high-precision tactile sensors and its human-like body has a soft exterior of urethane foam, for patient safety and comfort. Having robots do the lifting will ease the burden on staff, reduce injuries to health care workers, and help patients who want to live at home.

Another use of robot tech is a walking aid that can give a boost when the person is walking uphill and a braking action going down hills. The robot prevents falls and helps the user carry loads safely.

There are monitor systems that collect information aimed at improving nursing care services, and robots that can detect when a patient falls down or needs help. For example, robots are being developed that can predict when a person needs to go to the toilet and guide them there at the right time, helping them with removing clothing and other necessary motions.

In addition to their uses in nursing homes, robots can contribute to self-reliance for people who have some disabilities but want to remain at home.

The Japanese government wants patients to get used to robot helpers, hoping that by 2020, 80% of patients will accept having some of their care provided by robots. Several Japanese government agencies want to encourage businesses to develop care robots, and popularize them.

The RIKEN-TRI Collaborative Center for Human-Interactive Robot Research (RTC), where RIBA was developed, expects to bring care robots to market in the near future.

Priority Areas to Which Robot Technology is to be Introduced in Nursing Care – get information at METI.

For more information on long term care issues, see the Guide To Long Term Care,

 

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Want to live longer? Take care of someone

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Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

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Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rising

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From 1999 to 2014, United States deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rose by 54.5 percent. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Alzheimer’s death rate rose during those 15 years from 16.5 to 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people. In 2014, 93,541 people died from Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s, the leading cause of dementia and the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, caused 3.6 percent of deaths in 2014.

Researchers expect rates will continue to rise as life expectancy increases. About 5.5 million Americans are living with the disease. That number is expected to rise to 16 million by 2050.

There is a trend for more people with Alzheimer’s to die at home rather than a medical facility. The number of Alzheimer’s patients dying at home increased from 13.9 percent to 24.9 percent from 2009 to 2014. During the same time period, the number of who died from Alzheimer’s in medical facilities fell from 14.7 percent in 1999 to 6.6 percent in 2014.

The disease mainly affects people over the age of 65. The rise in Alzheimer’s cases is attributed to the increasing numbers of older people, as medical improvements have led to fewer deaths from conditions such as heart disease. However, some of the increase may be the result of more accurate reporting by doctors.

At this time there is no cure for Alzheimer’s. It is the leading cause of long term care insurance claims. To plan for possible long term care needs in the future, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

Planning to buy long term care insurance at some point? Remember you must buy before the diagnosis. There are many conditions like Alzheimer’s that are uninsurable, here is a partial list: Are You Insurable?

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Blood test coming to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease?

A research team has found a method to detect biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in blood platelets. The test uses a ratio between normal and abnormal brain tau proteins to identify those with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

The researchers found that the presence of abnormal tau proteins corresponds with decreased brain volume in parts of the brain where characteristics of Alzheimer’s appear.
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A non-invasive test for Alzheimer’s disease would help detect people at risk before symptoms develop, and make prevention and early treatment possible.

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2016 described using levels of the protein clusterin to ascertain which dementia patients are at risk of Alzheimer’s. Also, a 2015 study focused on using metabolites in saliva to detect cognitive impairment.

In 2016, 5.4 million Americans were affected by Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, consult the Alzheimer’s @Guide To Long Term Care.


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How your nose can expose your risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s researchers found that a person’s sense of smell declines strongly in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting a noninvasive “sniff test” for diagnosis.

The test can help identify the pre-dementia condition called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which often progresses to Alzheimer’s dementia in a few years.

David Roalf, Assistant Professor at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, led a study in which scientists used a simple, commercially available test called the Sniffin’ Sticks Odour Identification Test. Subjects have 16 different odours to identify.

Along with the sniff test, researchers administered a standard cognitive test (the Montreal Cognitive Assessment) to 728 elderly people who had already been diagnosed by doctors as healthy, having mild cognitive impairment, or having Alzheimer’s disease.

The research team found that the sniff test, when combined with the cognitive test, increased diagnostic accuracy. The cognitive test alone identified 75% of people with mild cognitive impairment; after adding the sniff test, 87% of cases were identified.

Using the two tests together also helped the researchers to detect subjects with Alzheimer’s and those who were healthy, and to determine the degree of cognitive impairment.

Doctors believe it is more possible to help people with Alzheimer’s disease if they begin treatment before dementia symptoms appear.
Genworth 2015 Cost of Long-Term Care Survey Chart

Many people get Long Term Care Insurance to protect themselves and their families against the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s and other dementias.


 

 

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Parkinson’s disease connected to bacteria in the gut

Some researchers have found a link between Parkinson’s disease and the bacteria in the digestive tract. The discovery may lead to a new way of treating Parkinson’s, through the digestive tract, rather than the brain. Finely targeted probiotics may be the answer. The scientists published their findings in the journal Cell.

Parkinson’s disease causes brain cells to accumulate excessive amounts of the protein alpha-synuclein and then die. Physical and mental effects include loss of motor function, tremors, shaking, and more. It seems to be caused by environmental factors rather than heredity.

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The researchers performed three different experiments that showed the link between bacteria in the gut and Parkinson’s disease. The experiments were performed on two sets of mice that were genetically modified so they overproduced the protein alpha-synuclein. One set of mice had bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract; the other set had none. Read more about the experiments at Cell.

So Parkinson’s patients may have bacteria in their guts that contribute to the disease, or lack beneficial bacteria that could prevent the disease. These patients have some kinds of bacteria in their digestive tracts that are not found in healthy people, and they lack some kinds of bacteria found in healthy people.

Parkinson’s disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. One million people in the United States and up to 10 million worldwide have Parkinson’s, making it the world’s second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s.

Past research indicates bacteria in the gut may also be connected with other diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. There has been found a type of bacteria that is a major cause of stomach (gastric) and upper small intestine (duodenal) ulcers.

To find out about insuring for the risk of these disabilities visit the Guide to Long Term Care


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