Want to live longer? Take care of someone

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Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

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Dying at Home

Most people (70%) want to die at home, in a familiar place surrounded by loved ones. However, only about 25% do. Nearly 50% of Americans die in a hospital, and another 20% die in a nursing home or long-term care facility.

The trend is for more people to die at home, with a 29.5 percent increase from 2000 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same time period, the percentage of deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities has dropped.

Seven out of ten Americans die from chronic disease, and more than 90 million Americans are living with at least one chronic disease. The Centers for Disease Control (2007) listed the ten leading causes of death in America (in order):
1.
heart disease
2.
cancer
3.
stroke
4.
chronic lower respiratory disease
5.
accidents
6.
Alzheimer’s
7. diabetes
8.
influenza
9.
pneumonia
10.
kidney disease and sepsis.

Almost a third of Americans see ten or more physicians in the last six months of their life. And almost 30% of Medicare’s budget each year is spent on patients who are in the last 12 months of their lives.

According to LongTermCare.gov about 70% of Americans over age 65 will require long-term care. If a person has an extended illness requiring long-term care, long-term care insurance will help cover those expenses whether in a hospital or at home. Studies show that those with long-term care insurance stay at home longer because the insurance provides more money for care. This includes extra money for home modifications like a wheel-chair ramp, a medical alert system and a stair lift.

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It is often the lack of money that prevents people from staying at home when they need care. Who pays for long-term care? In some cases they will spend all their savings and now are forced to rely on Medicaid (welfare health care). With a Partnership asset-protection insurance policy you will be exempt from the Medicaid spend-down requirement, the exemption is based on the total benefits your policy has paid out for care.

More than 80% of patients with chronic diseases say they want to avoid being in a hospital or intensive care unit when they are dying. While dying at home is usually preferred by the patient, it can be difficult for the caregiver. Hospice services can help.

Hospice care is for those in the last six months of their lives. More than 88% of hospice patients are Medicare beneficiaries.

Traditionally, for a patient to qualify for Medicare-supported hospice, a doctor must certify that the patient has: a home, a diagnosis of six months or less to live, a full-time caregiver, and a willingness to give up curative care and receive only palliative care.

In 2016 the Medicare Care Choices Model began offering some patients “concurrent care”: the choice of continuing curative care while starting palliative care and hospice care. An evaluation of concurrent hospice in non-elderly patients showed this plan improves quality of life and reduces costs.

The Medicare hospice benefit emphasizes home care, with almost 60% of patients receiving their care at home as of 2014. Medicare coverage is limited, additional care would be paid for out-of-pocket. Do you really want to spend-down your hard-earned savings and investments leaving open the option that Medicaid will require your estate to repay Medicaid for your care costs? There are 30 states with a filial responsibility law that could require your family to reimburse Medicaid.

Home care is much less expensive. Inpatient hospice services are used when the patient’s pain and symptoms must be closely monitored in order to be controlled, when medical intervention is required to control pain or symptoms, or when the family needs a rest from the stress of care giving.

A hospice team arranges for doctors, nursing care, medical equipment like wheelchairs and walkers, medical supplies, prescription drugs, hospice aide and homemaker services, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology services, social workers, dietary counseling, grief and loss counseling for the patient and family, short-term inpatient care, and short-term respite care.

After evaluation by a doctor, a patient can enroll in hospice care for two 90-day benefit periods, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day benefit extensions. A patient can decide to stop hospice care at any time.

A recently proposed bill, The Patient Choice and Quality Care Act of 2017 (H.R. 2797), aims to give patients and families living with advanced and life-limiting illnesses the information and services they need.

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How your nose can expose your risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s researchers found that a person’s sense of smell declines strongly in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting a noninvasive “sniff test” for diagnosis.

The test can help identify the pre-dementia condition called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which often progresses to Alzheimer’s dementia in a few years.

David Roalf, Assistant Professor at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, led a study in which scientists used a simple, commercially available test called the Sniffin’ Sticks Odour Identification Test. Subjects have 16 different odours to identify.

Along with the sniff test, researchers administered a standard cognitive test (the Montreal Cognitive Assessment) to 728 elderly people who had already been diagnosed by doctors as healthy, having mild cognitive impairment, or having Alzheimer’s disease.

The research team found that the sniff test, when combined with the cognitive test, increased diagnostic accuracy. The cognitive test alone identified 75% of people with mild cognitive impairment; after adding the sniff test, 87% of cases were identified.

Using the two tests together also helped the researchers to detect subjects with Alzheimer’s and those who were healthy, and to determine the degree of cognitive impairment.

Doctors believe it is more possible to help people with Alzheimer’s disease if they begin treatment before dementia symptoms appear.
Genworth 2015 Cost of Long-Term Care Survey Chart

Many people get Long Term Care Insurance to protect themselves and their families against the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s and other dementias.


 

 

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Groundbreaking ideas tested in high-tech Alzheimer’s facilities

A new concept is revolutionizing the care of patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The idea is an assisted living facility that is like a time capsule for residents. The home’s interior is designed to look like a small town in the 1940s. Each resident’s room is a small house, with a front porch light that turns on by timer every night. The carpet outside the rooms looks like grass, with “sidewalks” leading from one room to another. In the ceiling, fiber optics change from sunlight to stars for day and night. Chirping bird sounds make the space feel like outdoors. There is a movie theater, a barbershop, a saloon and salon and supermarket.

The idea is to set up an environment that nurtures memories, promotes functional independence, and stimulates new learning. This charming environment can trigger fond nostalgic memories that will help the residents relax. It also creates the feeling of living in a community rather than an institution.

The innovative environments are created by Jean Makesh, an occupational therapist who is CEO of The Lantern Group. The Lantern Group has Ohio facilities in Chagrin Falls, Ashtabula, and Madison, with plans to expand: website.

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For more information see “Alzheimer’s on GuideToLongTermCare.com

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5 things state lawmakers want to do about long-term care insurance

Legislators are wrestling with purchasing incentives, benefits options and rate stability

State lawmakers have a huge stake in improving private long-term care planning.

genworth nursing cost 2016States now spend about $100 billion per year, or about 6 percent of their $1.7 trillion in annual revenue, on Medicaid nursing home benefits and other Medicaid long-term care benefits for the poor, and for residents who have used “Medicaid planning” to protect their assets.

The share of state revenue going to fund Medicaid long-term care benefits could rise sharply starting around 2031, when the baby boomers begin to flow into the 85-and-older age category.

Read Rest of Story Here


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Americans underestimate senior care costs

A crisis may be growing around the need for senior care, and a lack of realistic perceptions and planning for it.

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“The trials and tribulations of child care are widely discussed and known,” said Jody Gastfriend, vice president of Senior Care at Care.com. “However, those issues are only part of the care challenges families face. Nearly half of U.S. adults in their 40s and 50s are already in the Sandwich Generation caring for a child and an aging parent. And with the number of people over the age of 65 set to nearly double by 2050, the emotional and financial weight of senior care is only going to intensify for families.”

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Many boomers in denial over problems growing old in suburbs

Greg Glischinski and his wife, Sheri, have lived in their two-story brick and wood Colonial-style house for more than three decades. The retirees, both in their 60s, want to stay where they are for the rest of their lives.

Screen Shot 2016-07-11 at 5.37.30 PMBut their house has no bedroom or full bathroom on the first floor. It is on a cul-de-sac, and public transportation options are limited. As they grow older, the Glischinskis may need in-home assistance with tasks like bathing, dressing and preparing meals – an expensive proposition.

“It’s a huge problem for boomers,” said Greg Glischinski, 66. “Quite frankly, I don’t know what we’re going to do.”

Read more here: Miami Herald

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