After Disaster: New Emergency Requirements for Nursing Homes

During Hurricane Irma, 14 people died at The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, Florida, due to a power outage that left residents in extreme heat. Lack of air conditioning made the building heat up like an oven. One of the victims died with a body temperature of 109.9 degrees. The nursing home’s owners now face criminal investigation and civil lawsuits.

In response to the tragedy, Florida Governor Rick Scott issued an emergency order requiring nursing homes to have generators that can run air conditioners.

The nursing home industry has brought court cases to challenge the emergency order. But in the meantime, state senators Lauren Book and Rene Garcia have filed bills to make the generator requirement a state law. Also, state senator Gary Farmer is preparing a more comprehensive Florida nursing home reform bill.

On the Federal level, U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz is sponsoring a bill that will require nursing homes to have generators that can run air conditioning for at least 96 hours in the event of an emergency power outage. The bill will also put nursing homes on the top priority list, along with hospitals, for restoring power after a hurricane.

The Federal bill provides for loans to help small facilities comply with the new regulation. Homes that have fewer than 50 beds, or a private room monthly rate of $6,000 or less could qualify for a loan to get the generators and other required equipment. This bill also sets up higher fines for facilities that break the rules and adds nursing homes to the critical infrastructure list so power will be restored there first.

Nursing homes are among the most important resources for long term care. For more information about long term care insurance see the Guide To Long Term Care.

 

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Dementia isn’t just one thing.

Dementia isn’t just one thing. “People sometimes use dementia and Alzheimer’s disease interchangeably. But that isn’t correct,” says John Haaga, director of Behavioral and Social Research at the US National Institute on Aging.dementiaDownload 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures.pdf – a statistical resource for U.S. data related to Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia, as well as other dementias.

You can donate to help the Alzheimer’s Association.

If you are at risk consider insuring before the diagnosis.

About Alzhiemer’s, The Leading Cause of LTC Insurance Claims

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Sources of Help for Seniors

There are many government-supported benefits for seniors, including some programs that are not widely known. Seniors and their caregivers can find services through some helpful online resources listed below.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has a Home Care and Hospice Agency Locator and a Caring Store with workbooks and manuals for caregivers.

The Visiting Nurse Associations of America has a Find-a-Provider website.

The Eldercare.net website contains a searchable database of resources that are available at the state and community level. For example, there are connections for legal services, elder abuse prevention, health insurance assistance, home health care, and long term care. Users can enter their data to search for specific programs to meet their individual needs.

The National Council on Aging provides a website called BenefitsCheckUp.org on programs for the elderly, which it says can help some seniors save thousands of dollars on the basic costs of living.


The Older Americans Act of 1965 (OAA) established a national network of federal, state, and local agencies that help older adults live independently, called the National Aging Network. Anyone 60 or older is eligible for services under the OAA; those most in need get priority. The network includes 56 State Agencies on Aging, 622 Area Agencies on Aging, and more than 260 Title VI Native American aging programs. Its programs are supported by tens of thousands of service providers and volunteers. A few examples of the many programs in the network are:

EyeCare America provides access to free medical eye care and annual eye exams;

Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which provides stay-at-home alternatives to living in a nursing home;

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), which gives workshops that help people manage health conditions such as arthritis, asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, cancer, depression, anxiety, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, osteoporosis, and HIV/AIDS.


For information on Long Term Care Insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Blood test coming to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease?

A research team has found a method to detect biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in blood platelets. The test uses a ratio between normal and abnormal brain tau proteins to identify those with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

The researchers found that the presence of abnormal tau proteins corresponds with decreased brain volume in parts of the brain where characteristics of Alzheimer’s appear.
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A non-invasive test for Alzheimer’s disease would help detect people at risk before symptoms develop, and make prevention and early treatment possible.

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2016 described using levels of the protein clusterin to ascertain which dementia patients are at risk of Alzheimer’s. Also, a 2015 study focused on using metabolites in saliva to detect cognitive impairment.

In 2016, 5.4 million Americans were affected by Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, consult the Alzheimer’s @Guide To Long Term Care.


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Groundbreaking ideas tested in high-tech Alzheimer’s facilities

A new concept is revolutionizing the care of patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The idea is an assisted living facility that is like a time capsule for residents. The home’s interior is designed to look like a small town in the 1940s. Each resident’s room is a small house, with a front porch light that turns on by timer every night. The carpet outside the rooms looks like grass, with “sidewalks” leading from one room to another. In the ceiling, fiber optics change from sunlight to stars for day and night. Chirping bird sounds make the space feel like outdoors. There is a movie theater, a barbershop, a saloon and salon and supermarket.

The idea is to set up an environment that nurtures memories, promotes functional independence, and stimulates new learning. This charming environment can trigger fond nostalgic memories that will help the residents relax. It also creates the feeling of living in a community rather than an institution.

The innovative environments are created by Jean Makesh, an occupational therapist who is CEO of The Lantern Group. The Lantern Group has Ohio facilities in Chagrin Falls, Ashtabula, and Madison, with plans to expand: website.

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For more information see “Alzheimer’s on GuideToLongTermCare.com

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Eli Lilly’s latest Alzheimer’s drug fails clinical trials

Eli Lilly’s drug solanezumab, designed to treat dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease, failed to show significant benefits in a large multi-national trial. The trial, which began in 2013, involved over 2,100 Alzheimer’s patients with mild dementia.

The pharmaceutical company announced that in the Phase 3 clinical trial of solanezumab, patients taking the drug did not show a significant slowdown in cognitive decline compared to those who took a placebo.

Solanezumab was designed to reduce the buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain. Some researchers have postulated that amyloid plaques may cause or contribute to the memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The failure of this trial brings that theory into question.

Some scientists say there is still no convincing evidence of a clear relationship between amyloid plaques and dementia. Amyloid deposits begin to form up to twenty years before the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, but may not cause it. Some people who have the plaques do not show cognitive decline.

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While disappointing, the failure of this trial will not end efforts to find a cure. The results of this test will stimulate the scientific community to look in other directions. Even failed trials can provide helpful information and point to new avenues for research.

The next drug to be tested will be aducanumab by Biogen, which also attacks plaques but in a different way.

Alzheimer’s disease is involved in 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases. Almost 47 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, and many require special care whether at home or in an institution.

Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of Long Term Care Insurance claims.


 

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California Partnership Plan: Changes Needed

After age 65, 70% of people will need long term care at some point. The costs are potentially staggering. Financial advisors recommend long term care insurance to protect oneself against the excessive costs of nursing home care or home services.

Medicare pays for doctors, hospital costs, drugs, and some other health care needs, but not for long term care – longtermcare.gov

Long term care is the care needed by someone who has difficulty with two or more activities of daily living (ADLs) over a period of 90 days or more. Over 12 million people in the United States need long term care now, with almost half of them under 65 years old.

One of the incentives for people to get long term care insurance is state Partnership plans, which allow insureds to protect their assets if they use up their insurance and need to apply for Medicaid (called Medi-Cal in California).

In the 1990s, California, New York, Indiana, and Connecticut were pioneer states in creating Partnership programs, where insurance payouts for long term care can be deducted from the insured’s assets if the plan runs out and Medicaid is needed. Partnership programs save states money by encouraging people to buy long term care insurance.

To encourage more Americans to plan for the risk of needing long term care Congress passed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA). The new law permits the creation of beneficial public/private partnerships; a joint-effort between states and insurance companies who offer Qualified Long Term Care Insurance Partnership Policies. States would then amended their Mediciad law(s) to allow for the Partnership.

Insurance companies have agreed to offer high-quality, affordable long term care insurance protection that meets the stringent requirements set by the federal legislation and states.

Not all policies sold in your state are Partnership qualified. The most common non-Partnership policies are sold through employers, unions, associations – these are group policies and only individual policies are Partnership. Not all insurance companies policies qualify for Partnership in every state, check with us about your state or a specific company.

Partnership policies not only offer benefits to pay for long-term care costs. They offer the special additional benefit of Asset Protection should you ever need to apply for Medicaid assistance.

Now most states have Partnership programs, but California’s program needs to be updated.

To qualify for the state Partnership, California requires a long term care insurance policy to have a minimum of  $190* a day in coverage and a 5% compound interest inflation protection for someone under age 70. But these requirements may make the premiums out of reach for average Californians.

In  Partnership states created after 2005,  inflation protection is the only requirement for a plan to qualify for Partnership and 3% compound is about half the cost of 5% compound, making a comparable California Partnership policy about twice the cost.

The requirements can change from year to year. But another problem is that California long term care insurance Partnership policies do not have reciprocity; that is, if the insured moves to another state, although the insurance policy moves with the insured, the Partnership asset protection no longer applies. You would have to move back to California to use the Partnership asset protection part of the policy.

All the other Partnership states have reciprocity – even the other Partnership pioneer states New York, Indiana, and Connecticut.

California spends over $14 billion annually on long term care through its Medicaid program (called Medi-Cal). The only state that spends more is New York at over $15 billion. Total long term care Medicaid spending for the United States is over $118 billion.

In 2005, about 1.5 million Californians used long term care services. That number is expected to skyrocket: 6.5 million Californians will be 65 and older by 2025. Nearly a million will be 85 and older, and many of them will need long term care.

It is obviously in the interest of states to encourage people to get long term care insurance. However, the policies have to be affordable or people will not insure. Also, since people move around, reciprocity between states is essential. California needs to make these changes to its Partnership program so it can include more people.

To find out more about Partnership plans nationwide, click here.

*2016 minimum daily requirement


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