Nurses laugh as a 89-year-old veteran dies in nursing home

An 89-year-old World War II veteran in a nursing home bed called for help, saying he couldn’t breathe.

A hidden camera recorded nurses failing to take life-saving measures for the patient and laughing as he struggled to breathe, and eventually died. The man’s family had secretly recorded a video, which was kept from the public for 3 years until a television station, WXIA-TV, persuaded courts to unseal it.

The family of James Dempsey of Woodstock, Georgia, sued the Northeast Atlanta Health and Rehabilitation Center in 2014. Two nurses lost their licenses after the video was made public in September, with a link sent to the Georgia Board of Nursing. The nurses did not start CPR immediately and did not follow emergency procedures; then they laughed while trying to start his oxygen machine.

The nursing home issued a statement claiming that care has improved since the incident, under different leadership. But records show continued problems at the home, including $813,000 in Medicare fines since 2015.

Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/lU6NlK3OQDc

The video will probably cause families to think seriously about care options for their loved ones, including home care in some cases. A long term care insurance policy can support care either at home or in a facility. Find out more and get insurance quotes at Guide To Long Term Care.

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Most Americans Incorrectly Believe Health Insurance or Medicare Pays For Long Term Care

More than half of Americans, 55%, incorrectly believe health insurance or Medicare will pay for long term care, the assistance with daily living that some people need because of illness or injury.

People who are sick or injured may need help with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, preparing food, and so forth that they would normally do for themselves.

A recent online survey asked adults how they would pay for assistance with activities of daily living if they are unable to take care of themselves for an extended period of time. More than half, 55%, said they would use Medicare or health insurance. But Medicare and health insurance, although they cover some of the medical costs, do not pay for long term assistance with daily living. See “Who Pays for Care”

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Medicare covers these costs for a maximum of 100 days (or until you stop improving). Medicaid will pay for these costs only when the individual’s assets are down to around $2,000 or $3,000 – depending on the state of residence – and Medicaid will recover the costs from the estate after death. This is often done with a lien on the Medicaid recipient’s primary residence.  How long will your savings/investments last if paying $75,000 a year per person for care?

The survey involved 2,065 U.S. adults age 18 and older. People over age 55 were more likely to say they would pay for long term care needs with health insurance and/or Medicare. People ages 18-54 were more likely to say they would borrow money from family and friends or use a credit card or loan. Long term care costs are estimated to be $70,000 a year or more, most of which will not be covered by health insurance or Medicare.

The U.S. Government Accounting Office and The Wall St. Journal report that 72% of Americans will need long term care at some time, either part-time assistance at home or full-time care in a facility. But people need to be educated about the costs of care and how to pay for it. Long term care insurance will relieve some of the burden. Many states now have available a Partnership insurance policy that protects assets by exempting the policyowner from Medicaid spend-down. Read more about The Partnership.

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Dying at Home

Most people (70%) want to die at home, in a familiar place surrounded by loved ones. However, only about 25% do. Nearly 50% of Americans die in a hospital, and another 20% die in a nursing home or long-term care facility.

The trend is for more people to die at home, with a 29.5 percent increase from 2000 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same time period, the percentage of deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities has dropped.

Seven out of ten Americans die from chronic disease, and more than 90 million Americans are living with at least one chronic disease. The Centers for Disease Control (2007) listed the ten leading causes of death in America (in order):
1.
heart disease
2.
cancer
3.
stroke
4.
chronic lower respiratory disease
5.
accidents
6.
Alzheimer’s
7. diabetes
8.
influenza
9.
pneumonia
10.
kidney disease and sepsis.

Almost a third of Americans see ten or more physicians in the last six months of their life. And almost 30% of Medicare’s budget each year is spent on patients who are in the last 12 months of their lives.

According to LongTermCare.gov about 70% of Americans over age 65 will require long-term care. If a person has an extended illness requiring long-term care, long-term care insurance will help cover those expenses whether in a hospital or at home. Studies show that those with long-term care insurance stay at home longer because the insurance provides more money for care. This includes extra money for home modifications like a wheel-chair ramp, a medical alert system and a stair lift.

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It is often the lack of money that prevents people from staying at home when they need care. Who pays for long-term care? In some cases they will spend all their savings and now are forced to rely on Medicaid (welfare health care). With a Partnership asset-protection insurance policy you will be exempt from the Medicaid spend-down requirement, the exemption is based on the total benefits your policy has paid out for care.

More than 80% of patients with chronic diseases say they want to avoid being in a hospital or intensive care unit when they are dying. While dying at home is usually preferred by the patient, it can be difficult for the caregiver. Hospice services can help.

Hospice care is for those in the last six months of their lives. More than 88% of hospice patients are Medicare beneficiaries.

Traditionally, for a patient to qualify for Medicare-supported hospice, a doctor must certify that the patient has: a home, a diagnosis of six months or less to live, a full-time caregiver, and a willingness to give up curative care and receive only palliative care.

In 2016 the Medicare Care Choices Model began offering some patients “concurrent care”: the choice of continuing curative care while starting palliative care and hospice care. An evaluation of concurrent hospice in non-elderly patients showed this plan improves quality of life and reduces costs.

The Medicare hospice benefit emphasizes home care, with almost 60% of patients receiving their care at home as of 2014. Medicare coverage is limited, additional care would be paid for out-of-pocket. Do you really want to spend-down your hard-earned savings and investments leaving open the option that Medicaid will require your estate to repay Medicaid for your care costs? There are 30 states with a filial responsibility law that could require your family to reimburse Medicaid.

Home care is much less expensive. Inpatient hospice services are used when the patient’s pain and symptoms must be closely monitored in order to be controlled, when medical intervention is required to control pain or symptoms, or when the family needs a rest from the stress of care giving.

A hospice team arranges for doctors, nursing care, medical equipment like wheelchairs and walkers, medical supplies, prescription drugs, hospice aide and homemaker services, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology services, social workers, dietary counseling, grief and loss counseling for the patient and family, short-term inpatient care, and short-term respite care.

After evaluation by a doctor, a patient can enroll in hospice care for two 90-day benefit periods, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day benefit extensions. A patient can decide to stop hospice care at any time.

A recently proposed bill, The Patient Choice and Quality Care Act of 2017 (H.R. 2797), aims to give patients and families living with advanced and life-limiting illnesses the information and services they need.

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