Cost of Long Term Care

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A lot of people incorrectly assume that health insurance and Medicare will cover long term care. They cover medically necessary care for up to 100 days, or until you stop improving or stablize. After that, you’re on your own.

The majority of Americans over 60 do not have long term care insurance yet 70% will need care. So, why do people not buy insurance?

Most will say the cost of the policy. An average policy, depending on age, health and benefits chosen, will cost $1,000-$3,000 per year per person.

But what about the fact that the same people who say they will “self-insure” for long term care will never “self-insure” a parking meter… they always put money in the meter, even though they could easily afford and “self-insure” the parking fine.

We make decisions based mostly on emotion. That’s what causes people to buy stocks when they are high and sell when it crashes, the opposite of what seasoned investors do.

What if you “self-insure” for long term care, how much will it cost you? The national average for nursing home care is $89,000/year with some areas over $140,000/year. Home care and assisted living average $50,000/year. See how much care cost in your state: download the Cost of Care brochure.

For every $1,000 of monthly retirement income you want to generate from your own savings, you will need about $230,000 in assets, according to the Schwab Center for Investment Research. For example, if you want only $3,000 a month, or $36,000 a year, you would need savings of $690,000. That’s a conservative estimate, assuming that you earn 5.2% on your investments and live off the earnings without dipping into the principal.

If you cannot afford a long term care insurance policy, how are you going to afford paying out of pocket? The other option is spending all your cash for your care. This includes anything of cash value: savings, investments like stocks, bonds, life insurance, annuities. Medicaid allows you can keep only $2,000.

There are 30 states with filial laws that allow the state to make your children repay Medicaid for your care expenses, although this is rarely done. Fifteen years ago the #1 reason people bought long term care insurance was they did not want to be a burden on their family. Today, the #1 reason is people do not want to outlive their money (and end up on Medicaid-Welfare Health Care).

Some people will buy long term care insurance for asset protection. Most states have a Partnership program that will protect assets from Medicaid if you own a Partnership long term care insurance policy.

You have five options to pay for long term care:

1. Self-insure.

2. Long term care insurance and Partnership.

3. Life insurance with long term care rider.

4. Annuity with long term care rider.

5. Medicaid.

The life insurance and annuity do not qualify for the Partnership (neither do group LTC policies). The life/LTC or annuity/LTC are often bought because: the person’s health will not qualify for traditional LTC insurance, or the person has too many cash assets and they’d never spend down to qualify for Medicaid. An old life policy or old annuity can be converted to one with long term care benefits without paying capital gains.

You can continue down the same road, uninsured, until either a diagnosis or a serious change of health, like a stroke, will disqualify you from insuring. Then you will only qualify for state assistance. At that point you would have to have used, sold or given away your assets 5 years before applying for Medicaid. Who has the ability to see 5 years into the future?

*  The best age to insure: the age your health will still insure you.
*  The best benefits to get: enough to cover what you cannot afford to pay out of pocket.


For updated quotes and more information visit: https://guidetolongtermcare.com


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HOW HEALTHY IS YOUR HEART?

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  • Tells you your heart age compared to your real age
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Plan your future: Get Long Term Care Insurance Quotes


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Why You Should Consider Long Term Care Insurance in Your Retirement Planning

If you haven’t already done so, now is an excellent time to consider adding long term care insurance to your retirement portfolio. Because uninsured long term care expenses can pose a significant risk to the assets you’ve worked a lifetime to accumulate, long term care insurance should be considered as part of a complete financial plan.
 
As former Senator told the United States Senate Special Committee on Aging, “Although the need for health insurance to cover a patient’s medical expenses in case of catastrophic illness is widely recognized, few people are insured against the costs of providing long term support services for that same person. This lack of insurance coverage jeopardizes the financial security of families and diminishes the economic security of the country.”
 
The likelihood that you may need long term care is significant.  Some 70% of Americans who reach the age of 70 can expect to utilize some type of long-term care during the remainder of their lives.  And while long term care includes a broad range of services, from in-home care to nursing home care, each comes at a cost.  Those costs could be substantial, and could have a significant adverse effect on your retirement portfolio.
 
Why? Most forms of health insurance focus on medical expenses, not the custodial care and nonmedical expenses associated with long term care. Medicare only covers nursing home care after a related three-day inpatient hospital stay and even then for only 20 days before a daily co-payment is assessed and Medicare only covers a total of 100 days.

Medicaid doesn’t kick in until one has spent down a significant portion of their assets (spend-down to $2,000*).  Therefore, if either you or your spouse needs long term care, you may have to pay for that care out of your accumulated assets … unless you have long term care insurance.

genworth-nursing-cost-2016The average cost of a private room in a nursing home met or exceeded $80,000 annually.  If one partner needs such care, the cost could quickly and substantially erode the assets acquired over a lifetime.
 
Let’s use a hypothetical couple living off the interest of $500,000 of invested assets to illustrate how serious an impact long term care expenses could have.

For the sake of this discussion, assume the couples’ investments are earning approximately eight percent annually, generating about $40,000 per year in income.  Let’s also presume this couple needs all of this income to support them while they’re living together in their home.
 
Based on an $80,000 annual cost for nursing home care, it may appear that this couple has enough for a little more than six years of care. However, that basic calculation does not consider the living expenses of the spouse who remains in the community.  

If this couple is using all of their investment income to provide for their living expenses, they will soon need to start withdrawing from the principle for a portion of those living expenses as well as for the long term care expenses of the partner who needs care.
 
In circumstances like these, it’s easy to see how the assets accumulated over a lifetime could soon be completely exhausted.
 
Long term care insurance can help provide the funds to pay for the care you may need, while simultaneously protecting the assets you’ve worked a lifetime to accumulate. Long term care insurance may also help preserve financial independence, choice, and dignity, and those can be priceless.
 
It’s never too early to consider insurance because your health can change at any time, meaning you may be uninsurable and end up paying out-of-pocket.

The Partnership Asset Protection program is available in most states. This will protect your home and assets to the limit as was paid by a qualified policy.

Some people have too many assets to benefit from the Partnership. They may prefer an annuity or life insurance with a long term care rider. You can use an existing whole/universal life policy or existing annuity to fund a new policy with long term care coverage. The Pension Protection Act allows this transfer without having to pay capital gains.

Feel free to contact us for more information or for an updated quote.

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.* States can differ on spend-down.

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Diabetes drug doing double duty as Alzheimer’s therapy

A drug developed for treating diabetes now shows promise for Alzheimer’s patients, according to scientists at England’s Lancaster University. The drug is described as a triple receptor agonist, or TA. It combines hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and Glucagon, activating these three receptors at the same time. The new study is published in the journal Brain Research.

A group of mice with Alzheimer’s-related symptoms were tested in a spatial water maze. The TA drug was injected once a day for two months. The mice who were treated with the drug remembered their path better than the control group.

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In addition to the memory improvement, other symptoms were improved: the accumulation of plaque in the brain was reduced; brain nerve cells were protected from deterioration and loss; and chronic nerve inflammation was reduced, as well as oxidative stress in the cortex and hippocampus. Increased levels of synaptophysin indicated protection from synaptic loss that occurs in Alzheimer’s. An increase of doublecortin positive cells showed improved neurogenesis.

Other diabetes drugs have shown promise for Alzheimer’s patients. The two diseases are known to be related, and type 2 diabetes increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials are proceeding to investigate the neuroprotective effects of extendin-4 and liraglutide.

Alzheimer’s cases are expected to triple in the next forty years, requiring more long term care. The increase in patients will bring financial challenges as well as medical ones. For more information on supporting Alzheimer’s and dementia patients, see the Alzheimer’s Section on Guide To Long Term Care.

 

Be Prepared: Get A Long Term Care Insurance Quote


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Millennials are most aware about long term care insurance

Only 20% of Americans have taken steps towards financing long term care, including even researching the costs. Millennials, who have long known that Social Security may not exist by the time they retire, are the generation most likely to have taken action on long term care insurance, according to Genworth Life Insurance Company, a long term care insurer since 1974.

Of people age 65 and older, 70% will need long term care at some point. However, only 52% of baby boomers believe they will need care. Millennials and members of Generation X are more realistic; 64% of Millennials (age 34 and younger) and 65% of Generation X (age 35-50) expect they may need long term care in the future.

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Most Americans (66%) mistakenly believe government programs will cover the costs of long term care. But Medicare only pays for skilled services or rehabilitative care, not for non-skilled assistance with activities of daily living, which is the bulk of long term care services.

Here are the 2016 national average costs for long term care in the United States (costs vary by state): $225/day or $6,844/month for a semi-private room in a nursing home; $253/day or $7,698/month for a private room in a nursing home; $119/day or $3,628/month for a one-bedroom space in an assisted living facility; $20.50/hour for a health aide; $20/hour for homemaker services; $68/day in an adult day health care center.

For those who are not prepared financially to handle their care costs, the burden will fall on their families and communities. It’s important for people who are growing older to talk with their families about their possible future needs and develop a plan — including how they will pay for care if needed.

Other facts the Genworth study showed Americans were uninformed about: 52% did not know that long term care insurance can cover help in their homes; 61% did not know that long term care can be personalized and that the insurer can help them find good care providers.

Insurers say people are never too young to begin planning for long term care costs, which can be a major expense and quickly use up retirement savings. To find out about long term care insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


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Eye Scan for Alzheimer’s

Scanning the eyes is a new way to detect Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in California say Alzheimer’s affects the retina, in the back of the eye, in a similar way to how it affects the brain. A high-definition eye scan can show the buildup of toxic proteins that indicate Alzheimer’s.

The plaque showing in the retina matches the plaque in a corresponding part of the brain. Through repeated scans of the retina over time, doctors will be able monitor the progression of the disease.

At one time, the only way to diagnose Alzheimer’s was by examining the brain after a person died. Now doctors can use brain scans to diagnose the disease in living patients, but these scans are expensive and invasive. The non-invasive eye scans will help doctors to detect the disease earlier, making it possible to intervene with medications and lifestyle changes before more symptoms appear.

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If you do not plan for your long term care who will? See the Guide To Long Term Care for more information on Alzheimer’s and how to prepare for long term care needs.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


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Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk

Nine factors that contribute to the risk of dementia

  • Mid-life hearing loss – responsible for 9% of the risk
  • Failing to complete secondary education – 8%
  • Smoking – 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression – 4%
  • Physical inactivity – 3%
  • Social isolation – 2%
  • High blood pressure – 2%
  • Obesity – 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes – 1%

These risk factors – which are described as potentially modifiable – add up to 35%. The other 65% of dementia risk is thought to be potentially non-modifiable.
READ  ARTICLE HERE

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Note: Insure before the diagnosis. Once diagnosed insurance is no longer available.

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


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