Caregivers At Risk.

It is not easy to talk about our parents or even ourselves getting older and some day needing help with very basic things. Here is information designed to educate the public about these issues.

Finding the words to begin a long term care conversation. (Genworth)

Beyond Dollars Infographic exposing the true costs of a long term care event. (pdf)

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LongTermCare.gov – Basic information about what is covered by Medicare and Medicaid.

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There are different ways to fund long term care: self-insure, long term care insurance*, life insurance or annuity with a long term care rider*, life insurance with a chronic illness rider*, Medicaid.
* Insurance is medical underwritten. Insuring locks in age and health.
27% of applicants ages 60-69 are declined because of health.

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Insomnia increases Alzheimer’s risk

Just one night without enough sleep can cause harmful proteins to build up in the brain, increasing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.

Past studies already linked insufficient sleep to increased risk of Alzheimer’s and other chronic diseases — but this recent study from Washington University,published in the Annals of Neurology, discovered what insomnia actually does to the brain.

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One of the functions of sleep is to clear the brain of waste, including amyloid beta proteins which can bond with each other and form plaques on nerve cells. These plaques build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

People with a genetic tendency for Alzheimer’s disease have higher than normal levels of beta amyloid proteins, even before they develop symptoms. After a night without sleep, these higher levels appeared in the healthy study participants.

Inadequate sleep has been linked to a 1.5 fold increase in the odds of developing Alzheimer’s. It’s not surprising, therefore, that research shows that sleep disorders such as sleep apnea increase the risk.

In the study, eight participants with no previous sleep or memory problems were instructed to either stay awake all night, get a normal night’s rest, or use the drug sodium oxybate to help them sleep. The sleep aid is supposed to increase the period of deep, dreamless sleep when the brain is thought to restore itself.

The scientists tested the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding each participant’s brain for amyloid proteins. Measurements were taken before the night of the test, and then every 2 hours the next day, to show how the night of sleep or no sleep affected the accumulation of these proteins in the brain.

Study participants who went without sleep for just one night had a 25-30% increase in the beta-amyloid proteins in their cerebrospinal fluid, bringing the levels to what researchers would expect to see in people who have genes for Alzheimer’s disease. Before the test, the participants all had normal levels. The pills designed to promote the deep sleep did not affect the levels of amyloid protein.

In a healthy person, normal sleep eliminates waste and restores the brain each night. But repeated nights of insufficient rest may overwhelm the brain’s recovery system, allowing amyloid proteins to build up and form plaques which interfere with the brain’s functioning.

For information on Alzheimer’s and also long term care insurance, see Alzheimer’s Section on the Guide To Long Term Care.

 

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Millennials are most aware about long term care insurance

Only 20% of Americans have taken steps towards financing long term care, including even researching the costs. Millennials, who have long known that Social Security may not exist by the time they retire, are the generation most likely to have taken action on long term care insurance, according to Genworth Life Insurance Company, a long term care insurer since 1974.

Of people age 65 and older, 70% will need long term care at some point. However, only 52% of baby boomers believe they will need care. Millennials and members of Generation X are more realistic; 64% of Millennials (age 34 and younger) and 65% of Generation X (age 35-50) expect they may need long term care in the future.

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Most Americans (66%) mistakenly believe government programs will cover the costs of long term care. But Medicare only pays for skilled services or rehabilitative care, not for non-skilled assistance with activities of daily living, which is the bulk of long term care services.

Here are the 2016 national average costs for long term care in the United States (costs vary by state): $225/day or $6,844/month for a semi-private room in a nursing home; $253/day or $7,698/month for a private room in a nursing home; $119/day or $3,628/month for a one-bedroom space in an assisted living facility; $20.50/hour for a health aide; $20/hour for homemaker services; $68/day in an adult day health care center.

For those who are not prepared financially to handle their care costs, the burden will fall on their families and communities. It’s important for people who are growing older to talk with their families about their possible future needs and develop a plan — including how they will pay for care if needed.

Other facts the Genworth study showed Americans were uninformed about: 52% did not know that long term care insurance can cover help in their homes; 61% did not know that long term care can be personalized and that the insurer can help them find good care providers.

Insurers say people are never too young to begin planning for long term care costs, which can be a major expense and quickly use up retirement savings. To find out about long term care insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Want to live longer? Take care of someone

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Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

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