Diabetes drug doing double duty as Alzheimer’s therapy

A drug developed for treating diabetes now shows promise for Alzheimer’s patients, according to scientists at England’s Lancaster University. The drug is described as a triple receptor agonist, or TA. It combines hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and Glucagon, activating these three receptors at the same time. The new study is published in the journal Brain Research.

A group of mice with Alzheimer’s-related symptoms were tested in a spatial water maze. The TA drug was injected once a day for two months. The mice who were treated with the drug remembered their path better than the control group.

alz101b

In addition to the memory improvement, other symptoms were improved: the accumulation of plaque in the brain was reduced; brain nerve cells were protected from deterioration and loss; and chronic nerve inflammation was reduced, as well as oxidative stress in the cortex and hippocampus. Increased levels of synaptophysin indicated protection from synaptic loss that occurs in Alzheimer’s. An increase of doublecortin positive cells showed improved neurogenesis.

Other diabetes drugs have shown promise for Alzheimer’s patients. The two diseases are known to be related, and type 2 diabetes increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials are proceeding to investigate the neuroprotective effects of extendin-4 and liraglutide.

Alzheimer’s cases are expected to triple in the next forty years, requiring more long term care. The increase in patients will bring financial challenges as well as medical ones. For more information on supporting Alzheimer’s and dementia patients, see the Alzheimer’s Section on Guide To Long Term Care.

 

Be Prepared: Get A Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Advertisements

Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk

Nine factors that contribute to the risk of dementia

  • Mid-life hearing loss – responsible for 9% of the risk
  • Failing to complete secondary education – 8%
  • Smoking – 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression – 4%
  • Physical inactivity – 3%
  • Social isolation – 2%
  • High blood pressure – 2%
  • Obesity – 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes – 1%

These risk factors – which are described as potentially modifiable – add up to 35%. The other 65% of dementia risk is thought to be potentially non-modifiable.
READ  ARTICLE HERE

dementia

Note: Insure before the diagnosis. Once diagnosed insurance is no longer available.

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.