Insomnia increases Alzheimer’s risk

Just one night without enough sleep can cause harmful proteins to build up in the brain, increasing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.

Past studies already linked insufficient sleep to increased risk of Alzheimer’s and other chronic diseases — but this recent study from Washington University,published in the Annals of Neurology, discovered what insomnia actually does to the brain.

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One of the functions of sleep is to clear the brain of waste, including amyloid beta proteins which can bond with each other and form plaques on nerve cells. These plaques build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

People with a genetic tendency for Alzheimer’s disease have higher than normal levels of beta amyloid proteins, even before they develop symptoms. After a night without sleep, these higher levels appeared in the healthy study participants.

Inadequate sleep has been linked to a 1.5 fold increase in the odds of developing Alzheimer’s. It’s not surprising, therefore, that research shows that sleep disorders such as sleep apnea increase the risk.

In the study, eight participants with no previous sleep or memory problems were instructed to either stay awake all night, get a normal night’s rest, or use the drug sodium oxybate to help them sleep. The sleep aid is supposed to increase the period of deep, dreamless sleep when the brain is thought to restore itself.

The scientists tested the cerebrospinal fluid surrounding each participant’s brain for amyloid proteins. Measurements were taken before the night of the test, and then every 2 hours the next day, to show how the night of sleep or no sleep affected the accumulation of these proteins in the brain.

Study participants who went without sleep for just one night had a 25-30% increase in the beta-amyloid proteins in their cerebrospinal fluid, bringing the levels to what researchers would expect to see in people who have genes for Alzheimer’s disease. Before the test, the participants all had normal levels. The pills designed to promote the deep sleep did not affect the levels of amyloid protein.

In a healthy person, normal sleep eliminates waste and restores the brain each night. But repeated nights of insufficient rest may overwhelm the brain’s recovery system, allowing amyloid proteins to build up and form plaques which interfere with the brain’s functioning.

For information on Alzheimer’s and also long term care insurance, see Alzheimer’s Section on the Guide To Long Term Care.

 

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After Disaster: New Emergency Requirements for Nursing Homes

During Hurricane Irma, 14 people died at The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, Florida, due to a power outage that left residents in extreme heat. Lack of air conditioning made the building heat up like an oven. One of the victims died with a body temperature of 109.9 degrees. The nursing home’s owners now face criminal investigation and civil lawsuits.

In response to the tragedy, Florida Governor Rick Scott issued an emergency order requiring nursing homes to have generators that can run air conditioners.

The nursing home industry has brought court cases to challenge the emergency order. But in the meantime, state senators Lauren Book and Rene Garcia have filed bills to make the generator requirement a state law. Also, state senator Gary Farmer is preparing a more comprehensive Florida nursing home reform bill.

On the Federal level, U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz is sponsoring a bill that will require nursing homes to have generators that can run air conditioning for at least 96 hours in the event of an emergency power outage. The bill will also put nursing homes on the top priority list, along with hospitals, for restoring power after a hurricane.

The Federal bill provides for loans to help small facilities comply with the new regulation. Homes that have fewer than 50 beds, or a private room monthly rate of $6,000 or less could qualify for a loan to get the generators and other required equipment. This bill also sets up higher fines for facilities that break the rules and adds nursing homes to the critical infrastructure list so power will be restored there first.

Nursing homes are among the most important resources for long term care. For more information about long term care insurance see the Guide To Long Term Care.

 

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Want to live longer? Take care of someone

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Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

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Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk

Nine factors that contribute to the risk of dementia

  • Mid-life hearing loss – responsible for 9% of the risk
  • Failing to complete secondary education – 8%
  • Smoking – 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression – 4%
  • Physical inactivity – 3%
  • Social isolation – 2%
  • High blood pressure – 2%
  • Obesity – 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes – 1%

These risk factors – which are described as potentially modifiable – add up to 35%. The other 65% of dementia risk is thought to be potentially non-modifiable.
READ  ARTICLE HERE

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Note: Insure before the diagnosis. Once diagnosed insurance is no longer available.

 

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Dying at Home

Most people (70%) want to die at home, in a familiar place surrounded by loved ones. However, only about 25% do. Nearly 50% of Americans die in a hospital, and another 20% die in a nursing home or long-term care facility.

The trend is for more people to die at home, with a 29.5 percent increase from 2000 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same time period, the percentage of deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities has dropped.

Seven out of ten Americans die from chronic disease, and more than 90 million Americans are living with at least one chronic disease. The Centers for Disease Control (2007) listed the ten leading causes of death in America (in order):
1.
heart disease
2.
cancer
3.
stroke
4.
chronic lower respiratory disease
5.
accidents
6.
Alzheimer’s
7. diabetes
8.
influenza
9.
pneumonia
10.
kidney disease and sepsis.

Almost a third of Americans see ten or more physicians in the last six months of their life. And almost 30% of Medicare’s budget each year is spent on patients who are in the last 12 months of their lives.

According to LongTermCare.gov about 70% of Americans over age 65 will require long-term care. If a person has an extended illness requiring long-term care, long-term care insurance will help cover those expenses whether in a hospital or at home. Studies show that those with long-term care insurance stay at home longer because the insurance provides more money for care. This includes extra money for home modifications like a wheel-chair ramp, a medical alert system and a stair lift.

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It is often the lack of money that prevents people from staying at home when they need care. Who pays for long-term care? In some cases they will spend all their savings and now are forced to rely on Medicaid (welfare health care). With a Partnership asset-protection insurance policy you will be exempt from the Medicaid spend-down requirement, the exemption is based on the total benefits your policy has paid out for care.

More than 80% of patients with chronic diseases say they want to avoid being in a hospital or intensive care unit when they are dying. While dying at home is usually preferred by the patient, it can be difficult for the caregiver. Hospice services can help.

Hospice care is for those in the last six months of their lives. More than 88% of hospice patients are Medicare beneficiaries.

Traditionally, for a patient to qualify for Medicare-supported hospice, a doctor must certify that the patient has: a home, a diagnosis of six months or less to live, a full-time caregiver, and a willingness to give up curative care and receive only palliative care.

In 2016 the Medicare Care Choices Model began offering some patients “concurrent care”: the choice of continuing curative care while starting palliative care and hospice care. An evaluation of concurrent hospice in non-elderly patients showed this plan improves quality of life and reduces costs.

The Medicare hospice benefit emphasizes home care, with almost 60% of patients receiving their care at home as of 2014. Medicare coverage is limited, additional care would be paid for out-of-pocket. Do you really want to spend-down your hard-earned savings and investments leaving open the option that Medicaid will require your estate to repay Medicaid for your care costs? There are 30 states with a filial responsibility law that could require your family to reimburse Medicaid.

Home care is much less expensive. Inpatient hospice services are used when the patient’s pain and symptoms must be closely monitored in order to be controlled, when medical intervention is required to control pain or symptoms, or when the family needs a rest from the stress of care giving.

A hospice team arranges for doctors, nursing care, medical equipment like wheelchairs and walkers, medical supplies, prescription drugs, hospice aide and homemaker services, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology services, social workers, dietary counseling, grief and loss counseling for the patient and family, short-term inpatient care, and short-term respite care.

After evaluation by a doctor, a patient can enroll in hospice care for two 90-day benefit periods, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day benefit extensions. A patient can decide to stop hospice care at any time.

A recently proposed bill, The Patient Choice and Quality Care Act of 2017 (H.R. 2797), aims to give patients and families living with advanced and life-limiting illnesses the information and services they need.

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Have You Had The Conversation?

The Conversation Project is dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end of life care. They offer a collection of “Conversation Starter Kits” that you can download for free.

Talking with loved ones openly and honestly, before a medical crisis happens, ensures that everyone understands what matters most to each individual at the end of life. You can use a starter kit for yourself, or to help others communicate their wishes.

conversation2There are several different kits: for families and loved ones of people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias; how to choose a health care proxy and how to be a health care proxy; how to talk to your doctor or nurse about your wishes; and one for parents of a seriously ill child.

There are starter kits in English, Spanish, Mandarin, French, Hebrew, Korean, Russian, Vietnamese, and Hindi.

Organizations can purchase printed copies to distribute and add their logos.

The cost of care can be devastating, the national average is over $7,000 per month. To plan means to be insured before needing care, even before the diagnosis and not everyone can health-qualify for insurance (Can You Qualify?).

To find out more about long term care insurance see the Guide To Long Term Care

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U.S. Congress increases money for Alzheimer’s research

Congress just increased the budget for Alzheimer’s research by $400 million for fiscal year 2017. In 2016 the budget for Alzheimer’s at the National Institutes of Health was about $910 million.

The number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to reach 14 million by 2050. It is estimated that for every $100 that goes into research, around $16,000 is spent in caring for people with the disease.

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Money for research has greatly improved the outlook for heart disease and cancer patients. In 2017, health and long term care costs for Alzheimer’s came to around $259 billion in the United States. That number is expected to rise to $511 billion by 2020. Since not finding a cure is expensive, more funding for Alzheimer’s research is obviously needed.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and long term care, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

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