Want to live longer? Take care of someone

Untitled-2

Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Advertisements

Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk

Nine factors that contribute to the risk of dementia

  • Mid-life hearing loss – responsible for 9% of the risk
  • Failing to complete secondary education – 8%
  • Smoking – 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression – 4%
  • Physical inactivity – 3%
  • Social isolation – 2%
  • High blood pressure – 2%
  • Obesity – 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes – 1%

These risk factors – which are described as potentially modifiable – add up to 35%. The other 65% of dementia risk is thought to be potentially non-modifiable.
READ  ARTICLE HERE

dementia

Note: Insure before the diagnosis. Once diagnosed insurance is no longer available.

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Dying at Home

Most people (70%) want to die at home, in a familiar place surrounded by loved ones. However, only about 25% do. Nearly 50% of Americans die in a hospital, and another 20% die in a nursing home or long-term care facility.

The trend is for more people to die at home, with a 29.5 percent increase from 2000 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same time period, the percentage of deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities has dropped.

Seven out of ten Americans die from chronic disease, and more than 90 million Americans are living with at least one chronic disease. The Centers for Disease Control (2007) listed the ten leading causes of death in America (in order):
1.
heart disease
2.
cancer
3.
stroke
4.
chronic lower respiratory disease
5.
accidents
6.
Alzheimer’s
7. diabetes
8.
influenza
9.
pneumonia
10.
kidney disease and sepsis.

Almost a third of Americans see ten or more physicians in the last six months of their life. And almost 30% of Medicare’s budget each year is spent on patients who are in the last 12 months of their lives.

According to LongTermCare.gov about 70% of Americans over age 65 will require long-term care. If a person has an extended illness requiring long-term care, long-term care insurance will help cover those expenses whether in a hospital or at home. Studies show that those with long-term care insurance stay at home longer because the insurance provides more money for care. This includes extra money for home modifications like a wheel-chair ramp, a medical alert system and a stair lift.

men-women-no$

It is often the lack of money that prevents people from staying at home when they need care. Who pays for long-term care? In some cases they will spend all their savings and now are forced to rely on Medicaid (welfare health care). With a Partnership asset-protection insurance policy you will be exempt from the Medicaid spend-down requirement, the exemption is based on the total benefits your policy has paid out for care.

More than 80% of patients with chronic diseases say they want to avoid being in a hospital or intensive care unit when they are dying. While dying at home is usually preferred by the patient, it can be difficult for the caregiver. Hospice services can help.

Hospice care is for those in the last six months of their lives. More than 88% of hospice patients are Medicare beneficiaries.

Traditionally, for a patient to qualify for Medicare-supported hospice, a doctor must certify that the patient has: a home, a diagnosis of six months or less to live, a full-time caregiver, and a willingness to give up curative care and receive only palliative care.

In 2016 the Medicare Care Choices Model began offering some patients “concurrent care”: the choice of continuing curative care while starting palliative care and hospice care. An evaluation of concurrent hospice in non-elderly patients showed this plan improves quality of life and reduces costs.

The Medicare hospice benefit emphasizes home care, with almost 60% of patients receiving their care at home as of 2014. Medicare coverage is limited, additional care would be paid for out-of-pocket. Do you really want to spend-down your hard-earned savings and investments leaving open the option that Medicaid will require your estate to repay Medicaid for your care costs? There are 30 states with a filial responsibility law that could require your family to reimburse Medicaid.

Home care is much less expensive. Inpatient hospice services are used when the patient’s pain and symptoms must be closely monitored in order to be controlled, when medical intervention is required to control pain or symptoms, or when the family needs a rest from the stress of care giving.

A hospice team arranges for doctors, nursing care, medical equipment like wheelchairs and walkers, medical supplies, prescription drugs, hospice aide and homemaker services, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology services, social workers, dietary counseling, grief and loss counseling for the patient and family, short-term inpatient care, and short-term respite care.

After evaluation by a doctor, a patient can enroll in hospice care for two 90-day benefit periods, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day benefit extensions. A patient can decide to stop hospice care at any time.

A recently proposed bill, The Patient Choice and Quality Care Act of 2017 (H.R. 2797), aims to give patients and families living with advanced and life-limiting illnesses the information and services they need.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Have You Had The Conversation?

The Conversation Project is dedicated to helping people talk about their wishes for end of life care. They offer a collection of “Conversation Starter Kits” that you can download for free.

Talking with loved ones openly and honestly, before a medical crisis happens, ensures that everyone understands what matters most to each individual at the end of life. You can use a starter kit for yourself, or to help others communicate their wishes.

conversation2There are several different kits: for families and loved ones of people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias; how to choose a health care proxy and how to be a health care proxy; how to talk to your doctor or nurse about your wishes; and one for parents of a seriously ill child.

There are starter kits in English, Spanish, Mandarin, French, Hebrew, Korean, Russian, Vietnamese, and Hindi.

Organizations can purchase printed copies to distribute and add their logos.

The cost of care can be devastating, the national average is over $7,000 per month. To plan means to be insured before needing care, even before the diagnosis and not everyone can health-qualify for insurance (Can You Qualify?).

To find out more about long term care insurance see the Guide To Long Term Care

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

U.S. Congress increases money for Alzheimer’s research

Congress just increased the budget for Alzheimer’s research by $400 million for fiscal year 2017. In 2016 the budget for Alzheimer’s at the National Institutes of Health was about $910 million.

The number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to reach 14 million by 2050. It is estimated that for every $100 that goes into research, around $16,000 is spent in caring for people with the disease.

whichgroup
Money for research has greatly improved the outlook for heart disease and cancer patients. In 2017, health and long term care costs for Alzheimer’s came to around $259 billion in the United States. That number is expected to rise to $511 billion by 2020. Since not finding a cure is expensive, more funding for Alzheimer’s research is obviously needed.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and long term care, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Alzheimer’s drug: another take on Solanezumab

images-1

The Alzheimer’s drug Solanezumab turned out to be a disappointment when clinical trials showed patients with long-established Alzheimer’s did not benefit from it. But a new study aims to find out if Solanezumab will help people who have high levels of amyloid in their brains but have not yet developed symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

Some people develop amyloid plaques in their brains years before Alzheimer’s disease symptoms appear. Amyloid plaques are a sticky buildup which accumulates outside nerve cells. These plaque formations can interfere with how the brain works, causing problems with memory and thinking. Research has shown that people with high levels of amyloid in their brains are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, though some do not. The drug Solanezumab provides an antibody that binds to the amyloid proteins, and may slow the progression of the disease.

Dr. Brian Ott of Rhode Island Hospital is leading a study on the antibody drug. The vaccine is supposed to attach to the protein that makes neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, and block it from causing degeneration of other cells. This is the first study to find out whether Solanezumab can help prevent Alzheimer’s disease through early intervention.

The trial will examine healthy people ages 65 to 85, with normal memory. The subjects will undergo a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan to measure the amyloid in their brains. Participants must pass a general health screening and have normal brain function and memory, but an elevated amyloid level. The participants will be randomly assigned to get either the investigative antibody drug or a placebo by intravenous infusion every month. Three out of four participants will receive the drug, and the rest will get the placebo.

The study will last three years, and the results will show whether the drug can change the course of Alzheimer’s disease when given before symptoms start.

alz101b

Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in America. It is the leading reason that people need long term care. For information on Alzheimer’s and long term care insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Mineral water may help Alzheimer’s

The silicon in mineral water may help Alzheimer’s by removing aluminum

Aluminium is widely present in our environment, and we are exposed to it in items such as bread, tea, wine, aspirin and other drugs, baby food, cookware, and cosmetics. It is even in the air we breathe. Aluminum can enter the iron transport system in the bloodstream and bypass the body’s natural barriers to toxins, accumulating in our bodies and brains.

Research has shown that aluminum exposure can cause the neurofibrillary tangles found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum toxicity has also been linked to Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurological diseases.

However, drinking mineral water that contains silicic acid, or silica, can help us excrete aluminum. The recommended amount of silica is 10 mg/day to protect against the adverse effects of aluminum absorption.

Clinical trials by Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University showed that drinking about a liter every day of mineral water containing 35 mg/liter of silicon sped up the removal of aluminium through the kidneys. After thirteen weeks, subjects showed significant reductions in the amount of aluminum in their bodies, even up to 70%. Along with the removal of aluminum came significant improvements in cognitive function and mental health, without side effects.

The silica follows water molecules through the gut wall and once it gets into the bloodstream, it unites with aluminium to form hydroxyaluminosilicate. This form of aluminium can be easily filtered by the kidneys and excreted in the urine.

The mineral water studied contained 35mg of silicon per liter. Brands of mineral water that contain silica include Fiji, which has 45 mg/liter, and Volvic, which has 20 mg/liter.

There are also foods naturally high in silica: brown rice, oats, millet, barley, potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, red beets, asparagus, bananas, green beans, and carrots.

For information on Alzheimer’s care, see the Guide To Long Term Care

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.