Dancing Benefits The Aging Brain

Doctors have long recommended physical exercise to reduce or delay the onset of dementia as people age. But a new study indicates that dancing may give even greater benefits than other forms of exercise.

Dr. Kathrin Rehfeld compared the effects of different kinds of exercise on volunteers with an average age of 68. Over 18 months, participants took part in either traditional fitness training with repetitive exercises like cycling or Nordic walking, or dance lessons which featured something new each week.

The study measured changes in the hippocampus, the area of the brain that is connected with learning, memory, and balance, and is affected by Alzheimer’s and similar diseases. In both groups, the hippocampus region of the brain increased. The dancers had a noticeable improvement in balance.

The dance routines varied and included jazz, square dance, line dance, and Latin. The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Other studies have found similar benefits to dancing:

A study at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine found that brain-stimulating activities such as reading, writing, and doing puzzles lowered the risk of dementia by 47 percent. This study did not find that regular bicycling, swimming, or team sports lowered the risk of dementia significantly. But ballroom dancing reduced the risk of developing dementia by 67 percent!

A study from Korea found that seniors who learned to dance the Cha Cha improved their memory and cognitive function over six months when compared to controls. A study from Canada found that seniors who danced the tango twice a week improved their cognitive scores.

The challenge of constantly learning a variety of new things may be one of the keys to the success of dance in improving mental ability. Dance requires a combination of mental and physical activity – dancers must remember the steps and executive them in rhythm. Also, dance is usually accompanied by music, and music has also been found to benefit people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Music stimulates memories and positive emotions, and body response to rhythms; music can also have the effect of making people more outgoing and sociable.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and dementia, see the Alzheimer’s Section of Guide To Long Term Care.

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Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rising

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From 1999 to 2014, United States deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rose by 54.5 percent. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Alzheimer’s death rate rose during those 15 years from 16.5 to 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people. In 2014, 93,541 people died from Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s, the leading cause of dementia and the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, caused 3.6 percent of deaths in 2014.

Researchers expect rates will continue to rise as life expectancy increases. About 5.5 million Americans are living with the disease. That number is expected to rise to 16 million by 2050.

There is a trend for more people with Alzheimer’s to die at home rather than a medical facility. The number of Alzheimer’s patients dying at home increased from 13.9 percent to 24.9 percent from 2009 to 2014. During the same time period, the number of who died from Alzheimer’s in medical facilities fell from 14.7 percent in 1999 to 6.6 percent in 2014.

The disease mainly affects people over the age of 65. The rise in Alzheimer’s cases is attributed to the increasing numbers of older people, as medical improvements have led to fewer deaths from conditions such as heart disease. However, some of the increase may be the result of more accurate reporting by doctors.

At this time there is no cure for Alzheimer’s. It is the leading cause of long term care insurance claims. To plan for possible long term care needs in the future, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

Planning to buy long term care insurance at some point? Remember you must buy before the diagnosis. There are many conditions like Alzheimer’s that are uninsurable, here is a partial list: Are You Insurable?

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U.S. Congress increases money for Alzheimer’s research

Congress just increased the budget for Alzheimer’s research by $400 million for fiscal year 2017. In 2016 the budget for Alzheimer’s at the National Institutes of Health was about $910 million.

The number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to reach 14 million by 2050. It is estimated that for every $100 that goes into research, around $16,000 is spent in caring for people with the disease.

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Money for research has greatly improved the outlook for heart disease and cancer patients. In 2017, health and long term care costs for Alzheimer’s came to around $259 billion in the United States. That number is expected to rise to $511 billion by 2020. Since not finding a cure is expensive, more funding for Alzheimer’s research is obviously needed.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and long term care, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

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Dementia isn’t just one thing.

Dementia isn’t just one thing. “People sometimes use dementia and Alzheimer’s disease interchangeably. But that isn’t correct,” says John Haaga, director of Behavioral and Social Research at the US National Institute on Aging.dementiaDownload 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures.pdf – a statistical resource for U.S. data related to Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia, as well as other dementias.

You can donate to help the Alzheimer’s Association.

If you are at risk consider insuring before the diagnosis.

About Alzhiemer’s, The Leading Cause of LTC Insurance Claims

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Mineral water may help Alzheimer’s

The silicon in mineral water may help Alzheimer’s by removing aluminum

Aluminium is widely present in our environment, and we are exposed to it in items such as bread, tea, wine, aspirin and other drugs, baby food, cookware, and cosmetics. It is even in the air we breathe. Aluminum can enter the iron transport system in the bloodstream and bypass the body’s natural barriers to toxins, accumulating in our bodies and brains.

Research has shown that aluminum exposure can cause the neurofibrillary tangles found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum toxicity has also been linked to Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurological diseases.

However, drinking mineral water that contains silicic acid, or silica, can help us excrete aluminum. The recommended amount of silica is 10 mg/day to protect against the adverse effects of aluminum absorption.

Clinical trials by Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University showed that drinking about a liter every day of mineral water containing 35 mg/liter of silicon sped up the removal of aluminium through the kidneys. After thirteen weeks, subjects showed significant reductions in the amount of aluminum in their bodies, even up to 70%. Along with the removal of aluminum came significant improvements in cognitive function and mental health, without side effects.

The silica follows water molecules through the gut wall and once it gets into the bloodstream, it unites with aluminium to form hydroxyaluminosilicate. This form of aluminium can be easily filtered by the kidneys and excreted in the urine.

The mineral water studied contained 35mg of silicon per liter. Brands of mineral water that contain silica include Fiji, which has 45 mg/liter, and Volvic, which has 20 mg/liter.

There are also foods naturally high in silica: brown rice, oats, millet, barley, potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, red beets, asparagus, bananas, green beans, and carrots.

For information on Alzheimer’s care, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Sources of Help for Seniors

There are many government-supported benefits for seniors, including some programs that are not widely known. Seniors and their caregivers can find services through some helpful online resources listed below.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has a Home Care and Hospice Agency Locator and a Caring Store with workbooks and manuals for caregivers.

The Visiting Nurse Associations of America has a Find-a-Provider website.

The Eldercare.net website contains a searchable database of resources that are available at the state and community level. For example, there are connections for legal services, elder abuse prevention, health insurance assistance, home health care, and long term care. Users can enter their data to search for specific programs to meet their individual needs.

The National Council on Aging provides a website called BenefitsCheckUp.org on programs for the elderly, which it says can help some seniors save thousands of dollars on the basic costs of living.


The Older Americans Act of 1965 (OAA) established a national network of federal, state, and local agencies that help older adults live independently, called the National Aging Network. Anyone 60 or older is eligible for services under the OAA; those most in need get priority. The network includes 56 State Agencies on Aging, 622 Area Agencies on Aging, and more than 260 Title VI Native American aging programs. Its programs are supported by tens of thousands of service providers and volunteers. A few examples of the many programs in the network are:

EyeCare America provides access to free medical eye care and annual eye exams;

Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which provides stay-at-home alternatives to living in a nursing home;

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), which gives workshops that help people manage health conditions such as arthritis, asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, cancer, depression, anxiety, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, osteoporosis, and HIV/AIDS.


For information on Long Term Care Insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Blood test coming to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease?

A research team has found a method to detect biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in blood platelets. The test uses a ratio between normal and abnormal brain tau proteins to identify those with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

The researchers found that the presence of abnormal tau proteins corresponds with decreased brain volume in parts of the brain where characteristics of Alzheimer’s appear.
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A non-invasive test for Alzheimer’s disease would help detect people at risk before symptoms develop, and make prevention and early treatment possible.

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2016 described using levels of the protein clusterin to ascertain which dementia patients are at risk of Alzheimer’s. Also, a 2015 study focused on using metabolites in saliva to detect cognitive impairment.

In 2016, 5.4 million Americans were affected by Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, consult the Alzheimer’s @Guide To Long Term Care.


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