Want to live longer? Take care of someone

Untitled-2

Seniors who take care of others live longer than those who do not.

This observation comes from an international research project in which scientists analyzed data from the Berlin Aging Study that followed 500 adults over the age of 69 from 1990 to 2009. About half of the subjects took care of friends, children, or grandchildren; these caregivers were still alive 10 years after their first interview in 1990.

For those who took care of non-family members, half were still alive seven years after the first interview. For those seniors who did not take care of anyone, 50 percent had died within four years of the first interview.

However, moderation in caregiving is essential. Other studies have shown that too much caregiving responsibility is stressful and can endanger one’s health.

Long term care insurance can help pay for needed care at home or in an institution. Some companies offer a cash benefit that can be used to pay a friend or family member for care. Get more information here: GuideToLongTermCare.com

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Advertisements

Dancing Benefits The Aging Brain

Doctors have long recommended physical exercise to reduce or delay the onset of dementia as people age. But a new study indicates that dancing may give even greater benefits than other forms of exercise.

Dr. Kathrin Rehfeld compared the effects of different kinds of exercise on volunteers with an average age of 68. Over 18 months, participants took part in either traditional fitness training with repetitive exercises like cycling or Nordic walking, or dance lessons which featured something new each week.

The study measured changes in the hippocampus, the area of the brain that is connected with learning, memory, and balance, and is affected by Alzheimer’s and similar diseases. In both groups, the hippocampus region of the brain increased. The dancers had a noticeable improvement in balance.

The dance routines varied and included jazz, square dance, line dance, and Latin. The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Other studies have found similar benefits to dancing:

A study at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine found that brain-stimulating activities such as reading, writing, and doing puzzles lowered the risk of dementia by 47 percent. This study did not find that regular bicycling, swimming, or team sports lowered the risk of dementia significantly. But ballroom dancing reduced the risk of developing dementia by 67 percent!

A study from Korea found that seniors who learned to dance the Cha Cha improved their memory and cognitive function over six months when compared to controls. A study from Canada found that seniors who danced the tango twice a week improved their cognitive scores.

The challenge of constantly learning a variety of new things may be one of the keys to the success of dance in improving mental ability. Dance requires a combination of mental and physical activity – dancers must remember the steps and executive them in rhythm. Also, dance is usually accompanied by music, and music has also been found to benefit people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. Music stimulates memories and positive emotions, and body response to rhythms; music can also have the effect of making people more outgoing and sociable.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and dementia, see the Alzheimer’s Section of Guide To Long Term Care.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Eye Scan for Alzheimer’s

Scanning the eyes is a new way to detect Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in California say Alzheimer’s affects the retina, in the back of the eye, in a similar way to how it affects the brain. A high-definition eye scan can show the buildup of toxic proteins that indicate Alzheimer’s.

The plaque showing in the retina matches the plaque in a corresponding part of the brain. Through repeated scans of the retina over time, doctors will be able monitor the progression of the disease.

At one time, the only way to diagnose Alzheimer’s was by examining the brain after a person died. Now doctors can use brain scans to diagnose the disease in living patients, but these scans are expensive and invasive. The non-invasive eye scans will help doctors to detect the disease earlier, making it possible to intervene with medications and lifestyle changes before more symptoms appear.

untitled-1
If you do not plan for your long term care who will? See the Guide To Long Term Care for more information on Alzheimer’s and how to prepare for long term care needs.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Everyone should do some estate planning.

Everyone—regardless of how small their wealth—should do at least some estate planning. 

Some things to consider include:

• A will: This is the most basic of estate-planning documents, yet a Caring.com survey this year showed that more than half of Americans don’t have a will. That’s surprising and troubling all at the same time. A will can provide certainty and clarity and eliminate  the grey areas when property is moving from one generation to the next. Don’t just assume everything will end up with the people you want it to if you fail to leave specific instructions.

• A trust: Not everyone needs a trust, but it often makes sense. Basically, a trust allows you to control your assets from the grave. You can set certain restrictions, which is especially helpful if your kids are young or they don’t really manage money well. That way you may be able to keep them from blowing their inheritance all at once. For example, a restriction might be that they don’t receive the money until they earn a college degree.

• Power of attorney: It’s important to assign someone power of attorney so that if you become incapacitated that person can speak on your behalf and sign important documents. You can also have a living will to outline your wishes, which could help your family make tough decisions about your healthcare.

If you don’t plan for your long term care who will?

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk

Nine factors that contribute to the risk of dementia

  • Mid-life hearing loss – responsible for 9% of the risk
  • Failing to complete secondary education – 8%
  • Smoking – 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression – 4%
  • Physical inactivity – 3%
  • Social isolation – 2%
  • High blood pressure – 2%
  • Obesity – 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes – 1%

These risk factors – which are described as potentially modifiable – add up to 35%. The other 65% of dementia risk is thought to be potentially non-modifiable.
READ  ARTICLE HERE

dementia

Note: Insure before the diagnosis. Once diagnosed insurance is no longer available.

 

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Dying at Home

Most people (70%) want to die at home, in a familiar place surrounded by loved ones. However, only about 25% do. Nearly 50% of Americans die in a hospital, and another 20% die in a nursing home or long-term care facility.

The trend is for more people to die at home, with a 29.5 percent increase from 2000 to 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same time period, the percentage of deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities has dropped.

Seven out of ten Americans die from chronic disease, and more than 90 million Americans are living with at least one chronic disease. The Centers for Disease Control (2007) listed the ten leading causes of death in America (in order):
1.
heart disease
2.
cancer
3.
stroke
4.
chronic lower respiratory disease
5.
accidents
6.
Alzheimer’s
7. diabetes
8.
influenza
9.
pneumonia
10.
kidney disease and sepsis.

Almost a third of Americans see ten or more physicians in the last six months of their life. And almost 30% of Medicare’s budget each year is spent on patients who are in the last 12 months of their lives.

According to LongTermCare.gov about 70% of Americans over age 65 will require long-term care. If a person has an extended illness requiring long-term care, long-term care insurance will help cover those expenses whether in a hospital or at home. Studies show that those with long-term care insurance stay at home longer because the insurance provides more money for care. This includes extra money for home modifications like a wheel-chair ramp, a medical alert system and a stair lift.

men-women-no$

It is often the lack of money that prevents people from staying at home when they need care. Who pays for long-term care? In some cases they will spend all their savings and now are forced to rely on Medicaid (welfare health care). With a Partnership asset-protection insurance policy you will be exempt from the Medicaid spend-down requirement, the exemption is based on the total benefits your policy has paid out for care.

More than 80% of patients with chronic diseases say they want to avoid being in a hospital or intensive care unit when they are dying. While dying at home is usually preferred by the patient, it can be difficult for the caregiver. Hospice services can help.

Hospice care is for those in the last six months of their lives. More than 88% of hospice patients are Medicare beneficiaries.

Traditionally, for a patient to qualify for Medicare-supported hospice, a doctor must certify that the patient has: a home, a diagnosis of six months or less to live, a full-time caregiver, and a willingness to give up curative care and receive only palliative care.

In 2016 the Medicare Care Choices Model began offering some patients “concurrent care”: the choice of continuing curative care while starting palliative care and hospice care. An evaluation of concurrent hospice in non-elderly patients showed this plan improves quality of life and reduces costs.

The Medicare hospice benefit emphasizes home care, with almost 60% of patients receiving their care at home as of 2014. Medicare coverage is limited, additional care would be paid for out-of-pocket. Do you really want to spend-down your hard-earned savings and investments leaving open the option that Medicaid will require your estate to repay Medicaid for your care costs? There are 30 states with a filial responsibility law that could require your family to reimburse Medicaid.

Home care is much less expensive. Inpatient hospice services are used when the patient’s pain and symptoms must be closely monitored in order to be controlled, when medical intervention is required to control pain or symptoms, or when the family needs a rest from the stress of care giving.

A hospice team arranges for doctors, nursing care, medical equipment like wheelchairs and walkers, medical supplies, prescription drugs, hospice aide and homemaker services, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology services, social workers, dietary counseling, grief and loss counseling for the patient and family, short-term inpatient care, and short-term respite care.

After evaluation by a doctor, a patient can enroll in hospice care for two 90-day benefit periods, followed by an unlimited number of 60-day benefit extensions. A patient can decide to stop hospice care at any time.

A recently proposed bill, The Patient Choice and Quality Care Act of 2017 (H.R. 2797), aims to give patients and families living with advanced and life-limiting illnesses the information and services they need.

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.

Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rising

1in3&69sec

From 1999 to 2014, United States deaths from Alzheimer’s disease rose by 54.5 percent. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Alzheimer’s death rate rose during those 15 years from 16.5 to 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people. In 2014, 93,541 people died from Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s, the leading cause of dementia and the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, caused 3.6 percent of deaths in 2014.

Researchers expect rates will continue to rise as life expectancy increases. About 5.5 million Americans are living with the disease. That number is expected to rise to 16 million by 2050.

There is a trend for more people with Alzheimer’s to die at home rather than a medical facility. The number of Alzheimer’s patients dying at home increased from 13.9 percent to 24.9 percent from 2009 to 2014. During the same time period, the number of who died from Alzheimer’s in medical facilities fell from 14.7 percent in 1999 to 6.6 percent in 2014.

The disease mainly affects people over the age of 65. The rise in Alzheimer’s cases is attributed to the increasing numbers of older people, as medical improvements have led to fewer deaths from conditions such as heart disease. However, some of the increase may be the result of more accurate reporting by doctors.

At this time there is no cure for Alzheimer’s. It is the leading cause of long term care insurance claims. To plan for possible long term care needs in the future, see the Guide To Long Term Care.

Planning to buy long term care insurance at some point? Remember you must buy before the diagnosis. There are many conditions like Alzheimer’s that are uninsurable, here is a partial list: Are You Insurable?

Long Term Care Insurance Quote


.

.

.

.