Mineral water may help Alzheimer’s

The silicon in mineral water may help Alzheimer’s by removing aluminum

Aluminium is widely present in our environment, and we are exposed to it in items such as bread, tea, wine, aspirin and other drugs, baby food, cookware, and cosmetics. It is even in the air we breathe. Aluminum can enter the iron transport system in the bloodstream and bypass the body’s natural barriers to toxins, accumulating in our bodies and brains.

Research has shown that aluminum exposure can cause the neurofibrillary tangles found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum toxicity has also been linked to Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and other neurological diseases.

However, drinking mineral water that contains silicic acid, or silica, can help us excrete aluminum. The recommended amount of silica is 10 mg/day to protect against the adverse effects of aluminum absorption.

Clinical trials by Professor Christopher Exley of Keele University showed that drinking about a liter every day of mineral water containing 35 mg/liter of silicon sped up the removal of aluminium through the kidneys. After thirteen weeks, subjects showed significant reductions in the amount of aluminum in their bodies, even up to 70%. Along with the removal of aluminum came significant improvements in cognitive function and mental health, without side effects.

The silica follows water molecules through the gut wall and once it gets into the bloodstream, it unites with aluminium to form hydroxyaluminosilicate. This form of aluminium can be easily filtered by the kidneys and excreted in the urine.

The mineral water studied contained 35mg of silicon per liter. Brands of mineral water that contain silica include Fiji, which has 45 mg/liter, and Volvic, which has 20 mg/liter.

There are also foods naturally high in silica: brown rice, oats, millet, barley, potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, red beets, asparagus, bananas, green beans, and carrots.

For information on Alzheimer’s care, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Calls to clear the way for research on cannabis for Alzheimer’s

According to brain experts, cannabis holds promise as a treatment for the causes of dementia and Alzheimer’s, but federal regulators are blocking the path to a cure. Recent discoveries, along with the legalization of marijuana for recreational use in some states, have brought calls for reforms in the laws that regulate cannabis research.

Researchers found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other compounds in the cannabis plant can help the body remove amyloid beta, the toxic plaque protein linked to Alzheimer’s Disease. The protein causes inflammation and kills neuron cells, causing deterioration of memory.

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California are finding that marijuana extracts may help prevent or treat Alzheimer’s disease. Cannabinoids are compounds found in marijuana, which can have medical applications. One study indicated that cannabinoids can relieve amyloid protein buildup and cell damage related to dementia using some of the brain’s own protective measures.

Unlike methods which seek to remove amyloid buildup from the outside of brain cells (such as those currently being explored by pharmaceutical companies), the method explored by Salk researchers works with the brain’s natural endocannabanoids to fight amyloid buildup inside cells, along with the resulting inflammation and cell death, at an earlier stage in the disease.

Endocannabinoids can active switches called receptors in the brain cells. Researchers found that these THC-like compounds that the nerve cells make themselves may help protect cells from dying.

Physical activity increases the production of endocannabinoids, which may explain why exercise can slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. THC from cannabis is similar in activity to endocannabinoids, and can activate the same receptors.

Marijuana is legal in California, but because the Salk Institute accepts some federal funding, it must abide by federal rules that require approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for any cannabis studies. The DEA classifies marijuana as a schedule I drug, alongside heroin and other dangerous drugs, impeding research that may help treat Alzheimer’s and dementia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cancer, glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. The bureaucratic approval process can slow down research by months or years. Some observers think that the pharmaceutical industry is creating regulatory obstructions for researchers because cannabis is a natural product and cannot be patented.

Health researchers estimate that one in three seniors will die with dementia. Someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease every 66 seconds. In addition to the loss of longevity and quality of life, the financial costs of Alzheimer’s and dementia are significant.

A 2015 study by the National Institutes of Health found that the price of late stage dementia exceeds that of any other disease; a recent estimate of cost was $236 billion for 2016, or around $287,000 annually per person.

Alzheimer’s affects more than five million Americans, according to the National Institutes of Health, and is a leading cause of death. Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia. The number of people with Alzheimer’s is expected to triple during the next 50 years.

For more information on Alzheimer’s and dementia, visit the Guide To Long Term Care

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New Hope That Healthy Gut Bacteria Can Prevent Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s may be more more preventable than previously thought. A new study indicates that healthy bacteria in the digestive tract may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.  

The study, from Lund University in Sweden, finds that unhealthy intestinal bacteria accelerate the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Published in the journal Scientific Reports, the study demonstrates that mice with Alzheimer’s have different gut bacteria than those who do not have the disease.

When a group of bacteria-free mice were exposed to bacteria from rodents with Alzheimer’s, their brains showed the beta-amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. Bacteria-free mice who were colonized with bacteria from healthy rodents developed significantly fewer brain plaques.

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Many of the body’s immune cells are found in the digestive tract. Scientists hypothesize that bacteria may affect T-cells in the gut that control inflammation, both locally and systemically. And inflammation is a factor in Alzheimer’s disease.

In a 2014 paper published in the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, researchers listed ten different ways that microbes in the gut may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease, including by fungal and bacterial infections in the intestinal tract and by increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

The composition of bacteria in a person’s digestive tract is determined partly by genetics, but can be affected by lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, stress, and exposure to toxins. A person can increase “friendly” gut bacteria by eating a healthy diet including whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, along with probiotics. This strategy may help to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease and how to plan for care, refer to the Guide To Long Term Care.

 

Note: You must insure before being diagnosed, this is true for many diseases like Parkinson’s, dementia/Alzheimer’s and many others.

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Sources of Help for Seniors

There are many government-supported benefits for seniors, including some programs that are not widely known. Seniors and their caregivers can find services through some helpful online resources listed below.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has a Home Care and Hospice Agency Locator and a Caring Store with workbooks and manuals for caregivers.

The Visiting Nurse Associations of America has a Find-a-Provider website.

The Eldercare.net website contains a searchable database of resources that are available at the state and community level. For example, there are connections for legal services, elder abuse prevention, health insurance assistance, home health care, and long term care. Users can enter their data to search for specific programs to meet their individual needs.

The National Council on Aging provides a website called BenefitsCheckUp.org on programs for the elderly, which it says can help some seniors save thousands of dollars on the basic costs of living.


The Older Americans Act of 1965 (OAA) established a national network of federal, state, and local agencies that help older adults live independently, called the National Aging Network. Anyone 60 or older is eligible for services under the OAA; those most in need get priority. The network includes 56 State Agencies on Aging, 622 Area Agencies on Aging, and more than 260 Title VI Native American aging programs. Its programs are supported by tens of thousands of service providers and volunteers. A few examples of the many programs in the network are:

EyeCare America provides access to free medical eye care and annual eye exams;

Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which provides stay-at-home alternatives to living in a nursing home;

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), which gives workshops that help people manage health conditions such as arthritis, asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, cancer, depression, anxiety, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, osteoporosis, and HIV/AIDS.


For information on Long Term Care Insurance, see the Guide To Long Term Care

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Concussions May Increase Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

According to a recent study published in the journal Brain, the mild trauma associated with a concussion can increase the risk of brain and memory impairment.

The researchers measured the thickness of the layers in the cerebral cortex of 160 war veterans, including many who had a history of concussion or PTSD. This region of the brain is associated with memory, language and other functions.

alzIn the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the cerebral cortex becomes thinner and begins to atrophy. The study showed that individuals who had concussions tended to have less thickness in the cerebral cortex.

Finding out how a concussion speeds up the onset of Alzheimer’s could lead to medicines or other treatments that would prevent the process. Early treatment would give patients the best chance to avoid the most devastating effects of the disease. The average age of the veterans who had pathological changes in their brains was 32.

Of special concern was the trauma of a concussion for someone who already has a genetic predisposition to get Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information on the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, see the Guide To Long Term Care:
Alzheimer’s Information
Veterans information


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Alzheimer’s research yields dental breakthrough – self healing teeth?

A drug designed to treat Alzheimer’s disease turns out to stimulate teeth to heal themselves, according to a new study published by the Dental Institute at Kings College, London.

Scientists previously found that activating stem cells in a tooth’s pulp will stimulate self-repair for small cracks and holes on the tooth surface. But the new treatment can bring about self-healing in larger holes, even all the way to the tooth’s root.

The tooth still has to be drilled, unfortunately, to remove the cavity. But if the process works, filling can be avoided, along with the risk of future decay around the filling. The teeth can generate new dentine – the mineralised material that protects the tooth from cavities.

The drug, Tideglusib, has already undergone clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease. But its application for tooth repair has so far only been tested on mice.

Researchers placed biodegradable collagen sponges into the mice’s teeth cavities, applying low doses of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3) inhibitors to the tooth; one of the molecules was Tideglusib. The application stimuated the renewal of stem cells and enabled the tooth cells to regenerate. The next tests will be on rats, whose teeth are four times the size. Human tests are expected some time in 2017.

Check out the Guide To Long Term Care for more information on Alzheimer’s disease.

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Blood test coming to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease?

A research team has found a method to detect biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in blood platelets. The test uses a ratio between normal and abnormal brain tau proteins to identify those with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions.

The researchers found that the presence of abnormal tau proteins corresponds with decreased brain volume in parts of the brain where characteristics of Alzheimer’s appear.
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A non-invasive test for Alzheimer’s disease would help detect people at risk before symptoms develop, and make prevention and early treatment possible.

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2016 described using levels of the protein clusterin to ascertain which dementia patients are at risk of Alzheimer’s. Also, a 2015 study focused on using metabolites in saliva to detect cognitive impairment.

In 2016, 5.4 million Americans were affected by Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, consult the Alzheimer’s @Guide To Long Term Care.


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